The European Screenwriters’ Manifesto is an initiative of the Federation of Screenwriters in Europe (FSE).

The Manifesto was debated and finalised at the First Conference of European Screenwriters in Thessaloniki on 21 and 22 November 2006 and signed by the 125 attendees. It was officially launched in several languages at the 57th Berlin International Film Festival, with the backing of 21 national writers’ guilds representing around 9,000 writers in Europe. Since then, new signatures have constantly been added through our website. The Manifesto has also been supported by the International Affiliation of Writers Guilds (IAWG).

Below you can read the Manifesto in English. The Manifesto is also available in other languages. At the bottom of the page you will find press articles and reports on the Manifesto.


Stories are at the heart of humanity and are the repository of our diverse cultural heritage. They are told, retold and reinterpreted for new times by storytellers. Screenwriters are the storytellers of our time.

European writing talent should be trusted, encouraged and supported. The European film industries need to find ways to attract and keep its screenwriters in the cinema and in their craft.

We assert that:

•  The screenwriter is an author of the film, a primary creator of the audiovisual work.

•  The indiscriminate use of the possessory credit is unacceptable.

•  The moral rights of the screenwriter, especially the right to maintain the integrity of a work and to protect it from any distortion or misuse should be inalienable and should be fully honored in practice.

•  The screenwriter should receive fair payment for every form of exploitation of his work.

•  As author the screenwriter should be entitled to an involvement in the production process as well as in the promotion of the film and to be compensated for such work. As author he or she should be named in any publication accordingly, including festival catalogues, TV listing magazines and reviews.

We call on:

•  National governments and funding agencies to support screenwriters by focusing more energy and resources, whether in form of subsidy, tax breaks or investment schemes, on the development stage of film and television production and by funding writers directly.

•  Scholars and film critics to acknowledge the role of screenwriters , and universities, academies and training programmes to educate the next generations in accordance to the collaborative art of the medium and with respect towards the art and craft of screenwriting.

•  Festivals, film museums and other institutions to name the screenwriters in their programs and plan and screen film tributes to screenwriters just as they do to directors, actors and countries.

•  National and European law should acknowledge that the writer is an author of the film.

•  National and European law should ensure that screenwriters can organise, negotiate and contract collectively, in order to encourage and maintain the distinct cultural identities of each country and to seek means to facilitate the free movement of writers in and between all nations.

We will:

•  Distribute this manifesto to industry members and the press in our respective countries.

•  Campaign for the implementation of the agenda defined by this manifesto.

•  Seek the transition into national and European law of the legal changes demanded by this manifesto.



By Geoffrey Macnab, Screendaily, October 22, 2009 > go

By David Pearson, Screendaily, May 14, 2009 > go

WGGB, February 23rd 2007 > go

WGGB, February 19th 2008 > go

IAWG, May 2007 > go

By Jay A. Fernandez, Special to The Times, February 21, 2007 > go

By Dalya Alberge,The Times, June 30, 2007 > go

FSE press statement > go

By Scott Galupo, The Washington Times, March 2, 2007 > go

To contact the FSE please send an email to info(at)